"Whilst our own Will our Passions shall restrain, / He [Nassaw] gives us each an Empire where to Reign"

— Hopkins, John (b. 1675)


Place of Publication
London
Publisher
Printed for H. Newman [etc.]
Date
1700
Metaphor
"Whilst our own Will our Passions shall restrain, / He [Nassaw] gives us each an Empire where to Reign"
Metaphor in Context
Before Thee there the ready Painter stands,
Inspire his Fancy, and inspire his Hands.
Thou Nassaw's Glories to the Artist show,
So shall he paint, that all the Draught may know,
Nassaw, who seems Immortal, shall be so.
Paint him Triumphant ore the peaceful Ball,
And at his Feet let Europe's Scepters fall.
Paint him Instructing heroes in the Field,
Paint him at once War's Thunderbolt and Sheild.
Paint him unmov'd in Dangers and in Blood,
Yet paint him Mild, and mercifully good.
Behind this Mars let fierce Bellona stand,
But paint Astræa smiling in his Hand.
To him be every mortal Vertue given,
Paint him the Conqu'ror of the Earth--
Paint too the pious Hero Conqu'ring Heaven,
Beneath his Throne, let the Iust Pencil draw
That ill fam'd Chief, who kept the World in awe.
Fix on the Ground Macedo's weeping Eyes,
But fix the loftier Nassaw's on the Skies
A future World this Monarch holds in view,
By pious force he shall that World subdue.
Abroad, he leading, we our Foes or'ecome,
And o'er our Selves grow Conquerors at home.
Whilst our own Will our Passions shall restrain,
He gives us each an Empire where to Reign.
What Pen, what Pencil strikes the vast Extent?
The Godhead can't be shaddow'd out by Poetry or Paint.
Provenance
Searching "empire" and "passion" in HDIS
Date of Entry
08/22/2004

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.