"'O why of these thy bounteous goods bereft, / 'And only to interior Reason left?"

— Brooke, Henry (c. 1703-1783)


Place of Publication
Dublin
Date
1735
Metaphor
"'O why of these thy bounteous goods bereft, / 'And only to interior Reason left?"
Metaphor in Context
But vain those gifts[1], those graces to relate,
Which all perceive, and envy deems complete.
"O Nature!" cries the wretch of human birth,
"O why a step-dame to this lord of earth?
"To brutes indulgent[2] bends thy partial care,
"While just complainings fill our natal air.
"Helpless, uncloathed, the pride of nature lies,
"And Heaven relentless hears his viceroy's cries.
"O wherefore not with native bounties bless'd,
"Nor thus in humble poor dependance dress'd?
"Give me the self-born garb, the bark of trees,
"The downy feather, and the wintry fleece;
"The crocodile's invulnerable scale,
"Or the firm tortoise's impervious mail;
"The strength of elephants, the rein deer's speed,
"Fleet and elastic as the bounding steed;
"The peacock's state of gorgeous plumage add,
"Gay as the dove in golden verdure clad;
"Give me the scent of each sagacious hound,
"The lynx's eye, and linnet's warbling sound;
"The soaring wing and steerage of the crane,
"And spare the toil and dangers of the main:
"O why of these thy bounteous goods bereft,
"And only to interior Reason left?

"There, there alone, I bless thy kind decree;
"Nor cause of grief, or emulation see."
Provenance
Searching "mind" and "interio" in HDIS (Poetry)
Theme
Inwardness
Date of Entry
08/09/2005

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.