"Such haply by that Côon artist known, / Seated apparent queen on Fancy's throne; / From thence thy shape his happy canvas blest, / And colours dipt in heaven thy heavenly form confest"

— Brooke, Henry (c. 1703-1783)


Place of Publication
Dublin
Date
1735
Metaphor
"Such haply by that Côon artist known, / Seated apparent queen on Fancy's throne; / From thence thy shape his happy canvas blest, / And colours dipt in heaven thy heavenly form confest"
Metaphor in Context
Or rather Thou, whom ancient prophet stiles
Venus Urania![1] born the babe of smiles,
When from the deep thy bright emergence sprung,
And Nature on thy form divinely hung;
Whose steps, by Loves and Graces kiss'd, advance,
And laughing Hours lead on the sprightly dance;
While Time, within eternal durance bound,
Harmonious moves on golden hinges round--
Such, Goddess! as when Silence wondering gazed,
And even thyself beheld thyself amazed;
Such haply by that Côon artist[2] known,
Seated apparent queen on Fancy's throne;
From thence thy shape his happy canvas blest,
And colours dipt in heaven thy heavenly form confest
--
Such, Goddess! thro' this virgin foliage shine;
Let kindling beauties glow thro' every line,
And every eye confess the work divine.
Categories
Provenance
Searching "fancy" and "throne" in HDIS (Poetry)
Date of Entry
01/25/2006

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.