"Alas! these joys are mine in dreams alone, / When cruel Reason abdicates her throne!"

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)


Place of Publication
London
Publisher
Printed for T. Cadell
Date
1789
Metaphor
"Alas! these joys are mine in dreams alone, / When cruel Reason abdicates her throne!"
Metaphor in Context
When welcome slumber sets my spirit free,
  Forth to fictitious happiness it flies,
  And where Elysian bowers of bliss arise,
I seem, my Emmeline--to meet with thee!
Ah! Fancy then, dissolving human ties,
  Gives me the wishes of my soul to see;
Tears of fond pity fill thy soften'd eyes:
  In heavenly harmony--our hearts agree.
Alas! these joys are mine in dreams alone,
When cruel Reason abdicates her throne!

  Her harsh return condemns me to complain
Thro' life unpitied, unrelieved, unknown.
  And as the dear delusions leave my brain,
  She bids the truth recur--with aggravated pain.
Provenance
Reading
Citation
Text drawn and corrected from OCR of 1789 edition in Google Books. Reading and comparing The Poems of Charlotte Smith, ed. Stuart Curran (New York and Oxford: OUP, 1993).

Elegiac Sonnets, By Charlotte Smith, 5th edition (London: Printed for T. Cadell, 1789). <Link to Google Books>

See also Elegiac Sonnets and Other Poems, by Charlotte Smith, 9th edition, 2 vols. (London: Printed for T. Cadell, Jun. and W. Davies, 1800). <Link to volume I in Google Books> <Link to volume II in ECCO> — Note, Curran uses this edition as his base text for Sonnets 1 through 59.
Date of Entry
07/09/2004
Date of Review
10/06/2011

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.