"Lord have mercy upon us! said the squire, did not I tell your worship to consider well what you were about? did not I assure you, they were no other than wind-mills? indeed no body could mistake them for any thing else, but one who has wind-mills in his own head!"

— Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de (1547-1616); Smollett, Tobias (1721-1771)


Place of Publication
London
Publisher
Printed for A. Millar
Date
1755
Metaphor
"Lord have mercy upon us! said the squire, did not I tell your worship to consider well what you were about? did not I assure you, they were no other than wind-mills? indeed no body could mistake them for any thing else, but one who has wind-mills in his own head!"
Metaphor in Context
Sancho Panza rode as fast as the ass could carry him to his assistance, and when he came up, found him unable to stir, by reason of the bruises which he and Rozinante had received. "Lord have mercy upon us! said the squire, did not I tell your worship to consider well what you were about? did not I assure you, they were no other than wind-mills? indeed no body could mistake them for any thing else, but one who has wind-mills in his own head!" "Prithee, hold thy peace, friend Sancho, replied Don Quixote; the affairs of war, are more than any thing, subject to change. How much more so, as I believe, nay am certain, that the sage Freston, who stole my closet and books, has converted giants into mills, in order to rob me of the honour of their overthrow; such is the enmity he bears me; but, in the end, all his treacherous arts will but little avail against the vigour of my sword." "God's will be done!" replied Sancho Panza, who helped him rise, and mount Rozinante that was almost disjointed.
(I.i.8, p. 89)
Categories
Provenance
Reading
Citation
Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de. The History and Adventures of the Renowned Don Quixote, trans. Tobias Smollett (New York: Random House, 2001).
Date of Entry
09/12/2008

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.