"[I]n short, it is very well attested, that he had one mistress, whom he inthroned, as sovereign of his heart, and to whom he recommended himself with great caution and privacy, because he piqued himself upon being a secret knight."

— Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de (1547-1616); Smollett, Tobias (1721-1771)


Place of Publication
London
Publisher
Printed for A. Millar
Date
1755
Metaphor
"[I]n short, it is very well attested, that he had one mistress, whom he inthroned, as sovereign of his heart, and to whom he recommended himself with great caution and privacy, because he piqued himself upon being a secret knight."
Metaphor in Context
"Yet, notwithstanding, said the traveller, I have read that Don Galaor, brother of the valiant Amadis de Gaul, never had any known mistress to whom he could recommend himself: and he was not disregarded, but looked upon as a very valiant and famous knight." "Signor, answered our hero Don Quixote, one swallow makes not a spring: besides, to my certain knowledge, that knight was privately very much in love; indeed, he made love to every handsome woman who came in his way; for, that was his natural disposition, which he by no means could resist: in short, it is very well attested, that he had one mistress, whom he inthroned, as sovereign of his heart, and to whom he recommended himself with great caution and privacy, because he piqued himself upon being a secret knight."
(I.ii.5, p. 127)
Provenance
Reading
Citation
Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de. The History and Adventures of the Renowned Don Quixote, trans. Tobias Smollett (New York: Random House, 2001).
Date of Entry
09/12/2008

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.