"If we give way to our Passions, we do but gratify our selves for the present, in order to our future disquiet; but if we resist and conquer them, we lay the foundation of perpetual peace and tranquillity in our minds."

— Tillotson, John (1630–1694)


Date
1694, 1704
Metaphor
"If we give way to our Passions, we do but gratify our selves for the present, in order to our future disquiet; but if we resist and conquer them, we lay the foundation of perpetual peace and tranquillity in our minds."
Metaphor in Context
Mortification of our lusts and passions, tho, like repentance, it has something in it that is troublesome, yet nothing that is unreasonable, or really to our prejudice. If we give way to our Passions, we do but gratify our selves for the present, in order to our future disquiet; but if we resist and conquer them, we lay the foundation of perpetual peace and tranquillity in our minds. If we govern ourselves in the use of sensual delight, by the Laws of God and reason, we shall find ourselves more at ease than if we should let loose the reins to our appetites and lusts. For the more we gratify our lusts, the more craving they will be, and the more impatient of denial. Crescit indulgens sibi dirus hydrops, every lust is a kind of hydropick distemper, and the more we drink the more we shall thirst. So that by retrenching our inordinate desires we do not rob ourselves of any true pleasure, but only prevent the pain and trouble of farther dissatisfaction.
(p. 72; cf. pp. 219-220 in 1694 edition)
Categories
Provenance
Reading
Citation
Text from Sermon 6, "The Precepts of Christianity not Grievous," The Works of the Most Reverend Dr. John Tillotson, 4th edition (London: Printed for B. Aylmer and W. Rogers, 1704). <Link to Google Books>

Found in EEBO in Sermons Preach'd Upon Several Occasions (London: Printed for Brabazon Aylmer and William Rogers 1694). See Vol. I, Sermon Sixth, on 1 John 5:3 "And his commandments are not grievous." <Link to EEBO>
Date of Entry
09/27/2011

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.