"Present peace and satisfaction of mind, and unexpressible joy and pleasure flowing from the testimony of a good conscience."

— Tillotson, John (1630–1694)


Date
1694, 1704
Metaphor
"Present peace and satisfaction of mind, and unexpressible joy and pleasure flowing from the testimony of a good conscience."
Metaphor in Context
Present peace and satisfaction of mind, and unexpressible joy and pleasure flowing from the testimony of a good conscience. This is present payment, besides that it is the earnest of a future and greater happiness. And this does naturally spring up in the mind of a good man; great peace have they that love thy Law, and nothing shall offend them. All acts of piety and virtue are not only delightful for the present, but they leave peace and contentment behind them: a peace that no outward violence can interrupt or take from us. The pleasures of a holy life have moreover this peculiar advantage of all the worldly joys, that we shall never be weary of them; we cannot be cloy'd by the frequent repetition of these pleasures, nor by the long enjoyment of them. I know that some vices pretend to bring great pleasure along with them, and that the delights of a sensual and voluptuous life make a glorious show and are attended with much pomp and noise, like the sports of children and fools which are loud and clamorous; or, as Solomon elegantly compares them, like the crackling of thorns under a pot, which makes a littie noise and a sudden blaze that is presently over. But the serious and the manly pleasures, the solid and substantial joys, are only to be found in the ways of Religion and Virtue. The most sensual man that ever was in the world never felt his heart touch'd with so delicious and lasting a pleasure as that is which springs from a clear conscience, and a mind fully satisfied with its own actions.
(p. 74; cf. pp. 226-7 in 1694 edition)
Provenance
Reading
Citation
Text from Sermon 6, "The Precepts of Christianity not Grievous," The Works of the Most Reverend Dr. John Tillotson, 4th edition (London: Printed for B. Aylmer and W. Rogers, 1704). <Link to Google Books>

Found in EEBO in Sermons Preach'd Upon Several Occasions (London: Printed for Brabazon Aylmer and William Rogers 1694). See Vol. I, Sermon Sixth, on 1 John 5:3 "And his commandments are not grievous." <Link to EEBO>
Date of Entry
09/27/2011

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.