"Then wolle the chambir of my thought trewly / Of plesaunce take a light in eche parté / Such ioy wolle him aray so fresshe and hy / That waken must myn heuy hert slepé / Out of his fowle and sluggissh slogardé."

— Charles [d'Orléans], duke of Orléans (1394–1465)


Work Title
Date
w. c. 1425-1440
Metaphor
"Then wolle the chambir of my thought trewly / Of plesaunce take a light in eche parté / Such ioy wolle him aray so fresshe and hy / That waken must myn heuy hert slepé / Out of his fowle and sluggissh slogardé."
Metaphor in Context
Hit shall be when the plesaunt lemys shyne
Of yowre most fresshe and ynly gret bewté
In at the wyndowes of my derkid eyene.
Then wolle the chambir of my thought trewly
Of plesaunce take a light in eche parté
Such ioy wolle him aray so fresshe and hy
That waken must myn heuy hert slepé
Out of his fowle and sluggissh slogardé
.
He shall no more then slepe, bi Seynt Quyntyne,
When that this light hath take on him entré
In at the wyndowes of my derkid eyne.
(ll. 1606-1616)
Provenance
Contributed by A. C. Spearing
Citation
See Charles of Orleans: The English Poems, ed. Robert Steele and Mabel Day (1941; repr. for the Early English Text Society by Oxford UP, 1970).
Theme
Interiority
Date of Entry
05/02/2012

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.