"He told Lord Montreville that Delamere had conceived suspicions of Emmeline's conduct, tho' he knew not from what cause, that had at first excited the most uneasy jealousy, but which had at length subsided with his love; that he had regained his spirits; and, when he left his mother and sister, seemed resolved to make a vigorous effort to expel from his mind a passion he was ashamed of having so long indulged."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)


Place of Publication
London
Publisher
Printed for T. Cadell
Date
1788
Metaphor
"He told Lord Montreville that Delamere had conceived suspicions of Emmeline's conduct, tho' he knew not from what cause, that had at first excited the most uneasy jealousy, but which had at length subsided with his love; that he had regained his spirits; and, when he left his mother and sister, seemed resolved to make a vigorous effort to expel from his mind a passion he was ashamed of having so long indulged."
Metaphor in Context
Crofts himself, who had at length torn himself from his bride to pave the way for his being received by her family as her husband, soon appeared, and confirmed all this. He told Lord Montreville that Delamere had conceived suspicions of Emmeline's conduct, tho' he knew not from what cause, that had at first excited the most uneasy jealousy, but which had at length subsided with his love; that he had regained his spirits; and, when he left his mother and sister, seemed resolved to make a vigorous effort to expel from his mind a passion he was ashamed of having so long indulged.
(III, pp. 159-160)
Categories
Provenance
Searching in C-H Lion
Citation
Emmeline, the Orphan of the Castle. By Charlotte Smith, 4 vols. (London: Printed for T. Cadell, 1788). <Link to ECCO>
Date of Entry
06/14/2013

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.