"'Tis however to be observ'd that whatever Pleasures or Pains we may happen to be sensible of, these do not spring up in the Mind of their own Accord, but are deriv'd to us, either from the Impressions of some Objects that are external to the human Soul, or from some Thoughts and Reflections, about which the Mind is immediatly employ'd."

— Campbell, Archibald (1691–1756)


Place of Publication
Westminster
Publisher
Printed by J. Cluer and A. Campbell
Date
1728 (1733)
Metaphor
"'Tis however to be observ'd that whatever Pleasures or Pains we may happen to be sensible of, these do not spring up in the Mind of their own Accord, but are deriv'd to us, either from the Impressions of some Objects that are external to the human Soul, or from some Thoughts and Reflections, about which the Mind is immediatly employ'd."
Metaphor in Context
I believe I need not here remark, that the Mind only is that Part of, the human Constitution, which is the proper or the only Seat of Pleasure and Pain, no sort of Matter, however modified, being at all capable of any Sort of Perceptions. 'Tis however to be observ'd that whatever Pleasures or Pains we may happen to be sensible of, these do not spring up in the Mind of their own Accord, but are deriv'd to us, either from the Impressions of some Objects that are external to the human Soul, or from some Thoughts and Reflections, about which the Mind is immediatly employ'd. These are the two great, and the only Sources of agreeable, or uneasy Perceptions, that I know, or can form any Notion of.
(p. 177)
Categories
Provenance
Google Books
Citation
Four entries in ESTC (1728, 1733, 1734, 1748).

See Arete-Logia or, an Enquiry Into the Original of Moral Virtue; Wherein the False Notions of Machiavel, Hobbes, Spinoza, and Mr. Bayle, As They Are Collected and Digested by the Author of the Fable of the Bees, Are Examin'd and Confuted; ... To Which Is Prefix'd, a Prefatory Introduction, in a Letter to That Author. By Alexander Innes (Westminster: Printed by J. Cluer and A. Campbell, for B. Creake, 1728). <Link to ECCO><Link to Google Books>

Note, the work's publication history is detailed in the ODNB: Campbell wrote the work after reading Mandeville's Fable of the Bees, and in 1726 he entrusted the manuscript to Alexander Innes, who published the work under his own name. In 1730 Campbell asserted his authorship of the Enquiry in the "Advertisement" to his Discourse Proving that the Apostles were no Enthusiasts. In the 1733 republication of the Enquiry, Innes's duplicity was made public.
Date of Entry
07/16/2013

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.