"Now,'tis this Dependence, which the Mind Is always conscious she has upon the Body, that engageth her in so very deep a Concern for it. For if the Mind suffer'd no Alteration in her State, from whatever Impressions might be made on it by external Objects, we have no Reason to believe, but that she would as easily part with a Limb, or any other Member whatsoever, as we now do with our Hair, and other Excrescences."

— Campbell, Archibald (1691–1756)


Place of Publication
Westminster
Publisher
Printed by J. Cluer and A. Campbell
Date
1728 (1733)
Metaphor
"Now,'tis this Dependence, which the Mind Is always conscious she has upon the Body, that engageth her in so very deep a Concern for it. For if the Mind suffer'd no Alteration in her State, from whatever Impressions might be made on it by external Objects, we have no Reason to believe, but that she would as easily part with a Limb, or any other Member whatsoever, as we now do with our Hair, and other Excrescences."
Metaphor in Context
Thus we see how the Mind necessarily depends, immediatly upon her own Body, and by Means thereof, upon other external Objects, for her Pleasures or Pains. Now,'tis this Dependence, which the Mind Is always conscious she has upon the Body, that engageth her in so very deep a Concern for it. For if the Mind suffer'd no Alteration in her State, from whatever Impressions might be made on it by external Objects, we have no Reason to believe, but that she would as easily part with a Limb, or any other Member whatsoever, as we now do with our Hair, and other Excrescences. But when the Mind sensibly feels, that the Body is the great Organ whereby, she receives so many of her agreeable and painful Sensations, and that these Things always happen, to her, according to the Condition the Body is in, and the Impressions it derives from external Objects, this makes her to interest her self in the State of the Body, as much as she does in her own Perceptions, and to employ as tender a Concernment about its Situation, as about the Manner of her own Existence. By which Means she always bears a mighty Liking and Good-will to the Body; which is very much encreased from considering its Usefulness, and that it serves as a very commodious Engine to carry her about in her Diversions and Amusements, and to procure other Objects which she feels as necessary to her Happiness.
(pp. 183-4)
Categories
Provenance
Google Book
Citation
Four entries in ESTC (1728, 1733, 1734, 1748).

See Arete-Logia or, an Enquiry Into the Original of Moral Virtue; Wherein the False Notions of Machiavel, Hobbes, Spinoza, and Mr. Bayle, As They Are Collected and Digested by the Author of the Fable of the Bees, Are Examin'd and Confuted; ... To Which Is Prefix'd, a Prefatory Introduction, in a Letter to That Author. By Alexander Innes (Westminster: Printed by J. Cluer and A. Campbell, for B. Creake, 1728). <Link to ECCO><Link to Google Books>

Note, the work's publication history is detailed in the ODNB: Campbell wrote the work after reading Mandeville's Fable of the Bees, and in 1726 he entrusted the manuscript to Alexander Innes, who published the work under his own name. In 1730 Campbell asserted his authorship of the Enquiry in the "Advertisement" to his Discourse Proving that the Apostles were no Enthusiasts. In the 1733 republication of the Enquiry, Innes's duplicity was made public.
Date of Entry
07/16/2013

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.