"Such Licentious Discourse tends to no point but to stain the Imagination, to awaken Folly, and to weaken the Defences of Virtue."

— Collier, Jeremy (1650–1726)


Place of Publication
London
Publisher
Printed for S. Keble, R. Sare, and H. Hindmarsh
Date
1698
Metaphor
"Such Licentious Discourse tends to no point but to stain the Imagination, to awaken Folly, and to weaken the Defences of Virtue."
Metaphor in Context
I don't pretend to have read the Stage Through, neither am I Particular to my Utmost. Here is quoting enough unless 'twere better: Besides, I may have occasion to mention somewhat of this kind afterwards. But from what has been hinted already, the Reader may be over furnish'd. Here is a large Collection of Debauchery; such Pieces are rarely to be met with: 'Tis Sometimes painted at Length too, and appears in great Variety of Progress and Practise. It wears almost all sorts of Dresses to engage the Fancy, and fasten upon the Memory, and keep up the Charm from Languishing. Sometimes you have it in Image and Description; sometimes by way of Allusion; sometimes in Disguise; and sometimes without it. And what can be the Meaning of such a Representation, unless it be to Tincture the Audience, to extinguish Shame, and make Lewdness a Diversion? This is the natural Consequence, and therefore one would think 'twas the Intention too. Such Licentious Discourse tends to no point but to stain the Imagination, to awaken Folly, and to weaken the Defences of Virtue: It was upon the account of these Disorders that Plato banish'd Poets his Common Wealth: And one of the Fathers calls Poetry, Vinum Daemonum an intoxicating Draught, made up by the Devils Dispensatory.
(pp. 5-6)
Provenance
EEBO-TCP
Citation
9 entries in ESTC (1698, 1699, 1728, 1730, 1738).

See A Short View of the Immorality, and Profaneness of the English Stage Together With the Sense of Antiquity Upon This Argument (London: Printed for S. Keble, R. Sare, and H. Hindmarsh, 1698). <Link to EEBO-TCP>
Date of Entry
10/01/2013

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.