"This Lady's fancy is just Slip-Stocking-high; and she seems to want Sense, more than her Breakfast."

— Collier, Jeremy (1650–1726)


Place of Publication
London
Publisher
Printed for S. Keble, R. Sare, and H. Hindmarsh
Date
1698
Metaphor
"This Lady's fancy is just Slip-Stocking-high; and she seems to want Sense, more than her Breakfast."
Metaphor in Context
There's a Description of Sucking for you! And truly one would think the Muse on't were scarsely wean'd. This Lady's fancy is just Slip-Stocking-high; and she seems to want Sense, more than her Breakfast. If this Passage would not shine, the Poet should have let it alone. 'Tis Horace's advice.

—et quae
Desperes tractata nitescere posse relinquas.
(p. 92)
Provenance
EEBO-TCP
Citation
9 entries in ESTC (1698, 1699, 1728, 1730, 1738).

See A Short View of the Immorality, and Profaneness of the English Stage Together With the Sense of Antiquity Upon This Argument (London: Printed for S. Keble, R. Sare, and H. Hindmarsh, 1698). <Link to EEBO-TCP>
Date of Entry
10/01/2013

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.