"He is never lost in smoak and Rapture, nor overborn with Poetick Fury; but keeps his Fancy warm and his Reason Cool at the same time."

— Collier, Jeremy (1650–1726)


Place of Publication
London
Publisher
Printed for S. Keble, R. Sare, and H. Hindmarsh
Date
1698
Metaphor
"He is never lost in smoak and Rapture, nor overborn with Poetick Fury; but keeps his Fancy warm and his Reason Cool at the same time."
Metaphor in Context
To the Testimony of Homer, I shall joyn that of Virgil, who tho' He follows at a great distance of Time, was an Author of the first Rank, and wrote the same kind of Poetry with the other. Now Virgil tho' he is very extraordinary in his Genius, in the Compass of his Learning, in the Musick and Majesty of his Stile; yet the exactness of his Judgment seems to be his peculiar, and most distinguishing Talent. He had the truest Relish imaginable, and always described Things according to Nature, Custom, and Decency. He wrote with the greatest Command of Temper, and Superiority of good Sense. He is never lost in smoak and Rapture, nor overborn with Poetick Fury; but keeps his Fancy warm and his Reason Cool at the same time. Now this great Master of Propriety never Mentions any Priests without some Marks of Advantage. To give some Instances as they lie in Order.
(pp. 113-4)
Provenance
EEBO-TCP
Citation
9 entries in ESTC (1698, 1699, 1728, 1730, 1738).

See A Short View of the Immorality, and Profaneness of the English Stage Together With the Sense of Antiquity Upon This Argument (London: Printed for S. Keble, R. Sare, and H. Hindmarsh, 1698). <Link to EEBO-TCP>
Date of Entry
10/01/2013

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.