"No body can be pleas'd without Sensible Impressions. Nor can such Perceptions be received without a Train of Passions attending them."

— Collier, Jeremy (1650–1726)


Place of Publication
London
Publisher
Printed for S. Keble, R. Sare, and H. Hindmarsh
Date
1698
Metaphor
"No body can be pleas'd without Sensible Impressions. Nor can such Perceptions be received without a Train of Passions attending them."
Metaphor in Context
And granting the Regards of Quality, the Advantages of Age, or Temper, may fortifie some People; granting Modesty secur'd, and the Diversion as it were refin'd by this Means: Yet a Man must not expect to stand by perfectly unmoved, and impregnable. No body can be pleas'd without Sensible Impressions. Nor can such Perceptions be received without a Train of Passions attending them. These Consequences will be sure to work back upon their Causes, solicite the Fancy, and heighten the Original Pleasure. But if a Man pretends to be a Stoick at Plays, he falls under another Imputation. For where there is no Impression, there can be no Pleasure: And then the Spectator is very much Impertinent, in going where he gets nothing for his Pains. And if this were all; I suppose Christians have something else to do than to ramble about to no purpose. (pp. 255-6)
Categories
Provenance
EEBO-TCP
Citation
9 entries in ESTC (1698, 1699, 1728, 1730, 1738).

See A Short View of the Immorality, and Profaneness of the English Stage Together With the Sense of Antiquity Upon This Argument (London: Printed for S. Keble, R. Sare, and H. Hindmarsh, 1698). <Link to EEBO-TCP>
Date of Entry
10/01/2013

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.