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Date: 1692

"He has clearly overthrown all those Metaphysical Whymsies, which infected mens Brains with a Spice of Madness, whereby they feign'd a Knowledge where they had none, by making a noise with Sounds, without clear and distinct Significations."

— Molyneux, William (1656-1698)

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Date: 1692

"In what a miserable condition do we count those, in whom it hath pleased the great Contriver of the Eyes and Sight, to shut those two little Windows of the Soul?"

— Molyneux, William (1656-1698)

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Date: 1692

"[T]he Explanation whereof is allowed by all men as satisfactory, 'tis this, in Tab. 41. Fig. 2. the Image a b of the Object A B is painted on the Retina inverted, and yet the Eye (or rather the Soul by means of the Eye) sees the Object erect and in its natural Posture."

— Molyneux, William (1656-1698)

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Date: 1699

"My Friendship even yet does balance Passion; but throw in the least grain more of an affront, and by Heaven you turn the Scale."

— Farquhar, George (1676/7-1707)

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Date: 1700

"View your own Charms, Madam, then judge my Passion."

— Farquhar, George (1676/7-1707)

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Date: 1700

"This Commission, Madam, was my Pasport to the Fair; adding a nobleness to my Passion, it stampt a value on my Love"

— Farquhar, George (1676/7-1707)

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Date: 1700

"I cannot view you, Madam: For when you speak, all the Faculties of my charm'd Soul crowd to my attentive Ears; desert my Eyes, which gaze insensibly"

— Farquhar, George (1676/7-1707)

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Date: 1702

"O Woman, Woman, of Artifice created! whose Nature, even distracted, has a Cunning: In vain let Man his Sense, his Learning boast, when Womans Madness over-rules his Reason."

— Farquhar, George (1676/7-1707)

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Date: 1706

Reason may still keep "its Throne, but it nods a little"

— Farquhar, George (1676/7-1707)

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Date: March 16, 1696/7; 1708

"I fansy I pretty well guess what it is that some Men find mischievous in your 'Essay': 'Tis opening the Eyes of the Ignorant, and rectifying the Methods of Reasoning, which perhaps may undermine some received Errors, and so abridge the Empire of Darkness; wherein, though the Subject wander deplo...

— Molyneux, William (1656-1698)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.