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Date: 1704

"The Springs he drank were like his Conscience clear."

— Anonymous

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Date: 1707

The mind may be "soak'd in the bottom of the Belly" of one's Ignorance so that he needs the syrup of understanding and knowledge "to liquify the Matter" of his thoughts

— Anonymous

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Date: 1712

"The strange and absurd Variety that is so apparent in Men's Actions, shews plainly they can never proceed immediately from Reason; so pure a Fountain emits no such troubled Waters: They must necessarily arise from the Passions, which are to the Mind as the Winds to a Ship, they only can move it,...

— Anonymous

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Date: 1746

"The Ground needs no other midwifery in bringing forth Weeds, than only the neglect of the Husbandman's Hand to pluck them up; the Air needs no other Cause of Darkness, than the Absence of Sun; nor water of Coldness, than its Distance from the Fire, because these are the genuine Products of Nature."

— Anonymous

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Date: 1748

"The Soul is created in a State of moral Rectitude, but receives its vicious Tinctures from the Body, and is warped into its perverse and crooked Disposition by the Influence of the Senses"

— Anonymous

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Date: 1662, 1762

"My soul melteth away for very heaviness: comfort thou me according unto thy word."

— The Church of England

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Date: 1765

"The best Way to prove the Clearness of our Mind is by shewing its Faults; as when a Stream discovers the Dirt at the Bottom, it convinces us of the Transparency and Purity of the Water."

— Anonymous

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Date: 1765

"Human Reason is a Tincture, infus'd, in a Proportion almost equal, into all our Opinions and Customs of what Form soever they be."

— Anonymous

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Date: 1772

"No inference can give a juster idea of Des Cartes's doctrine of automata, than Mr. Regis's comparison of some hydraulic machines, to be seen in certain grottos and fountains, that serve as ornaments to the splendid mansions of the great; where water exerts itself by the disposition of the pipes,...

— Anonymous

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Date: October, 1784

"Peace is the calm which succeeds the tempest, and hushes the billows of interest and passion to rest."

— Anonymous

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.