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Date: 1725

"Thus a Tempest at Sea is often an Emblem of Wrath"

— Hutcheson, Francis (1694-1746)

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Date: 1728

"So if we have confused Sensation strengthning and fixing our private Desires, the like Sensation joined to publick Affections is necessary, lest the former Desires should wholly engross our Minds: If weight be cast into one Scale, as much must be put into the other to preserve an <...

— Hutcheson, Francis (1694-1746)

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Date: 1728

"'Tis true indeed, that there are few Tempers to be found, wherein these Sensations of the several Passions are in such a Ballance, as in all cases to leave the Mind in a proper State, for considering the Importance of every Action or Event."

— Hutcheson, Francis (1694-1746)

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Date: 1728

"[D]id we consider that the time will come, when we shall be as conscious of his Presence, as we are of our own Existence; as sensible of his Approbation or [195] Condemnation, as we are of the Testimony of our own Hearts; ... how should we despise that Honour which is...

— Hutcheson, Francis (1694-1746)

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Date: 1728

A peevish, pettish temper "disarms the Heart of its natural Integrity; it induces us to throw away our true Armour, our natural Courage, and cowardly to commit our selves to the vain Protection of others, while we neglect our own Defence"

— Hutcheson, Francis (1694-1746)

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Date: 1747

"With such goodness is our nature constituted, so gentle is the reign of virtue, that it restrains not its subjects from that enjoyment of bodily pleasures, which upon a right estimate will be found the sweetest: altho’ this she demands, that we should still preserve so lively a sense of the supe...

— Hutcheson, Francis (1694-1746)

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Date: 1747

"But on the other hand under the empire of sensuality there’s no admittance for the virtues; all the nobler joys from a conscious goodness, a sense of virtue, and deserving well of others, must be banished; and generally along with them even the rational manly pleasures of the ingenious arts."

— Hutcheson, Francis (1694-1746)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.