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Date: 1766

"Nature, my friend, profuse in vain, / May every gift impart; / If unimprov'd, they ne'er can gain / An empire o'er the heart."

— Anstey, Christopher (1724-1805)

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Date: 1768

"And reason fixed her empire in my breast."

— Pye, Henry James (1745-1813)

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Date: 1773

"Fancy no more on airy wings shall rise, / We now must scold the maids, and make the pies."

— More, Hannah (1745-1833)

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Date: 1777

"Courage, the warrior's bosom steel'd."

— Polwhele, Richard (1760-1838)

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Date: 1777

Women "may cultivate the rose of imagination, and the valuable fruits of morals and criticism; but the steeps of Parnassus few comparatively, have attempted to scale with success."

— More, Hannah (1745-1833)

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Date: 1777

"In short, it appears that the mind in each sex has some natural kind of bias, which constitutes a distinction of character, and that the happiness of both depends, in a great measure, on the preservation and observance of this distinction."

— More, Hannah (1745-1833)

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Date: 1777

"Study, as it rescues the mind from an inordinate fondness for gaming, dress, and public amusements, is an oeconomical propensity; for a lady may read at much less expence than she can play at cards; as it requires some application, it gives the mind an habit of industry; as it is a relief agains...

— More, Hannah (1745-1833)

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Date: 1777

"The philosophical doctrine of the slow recession of bodies from the sun, is a lively image of the reluctance with which we first abandon the light of virtue."

— More, Hannah (1745-1833)

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Date: 1777

"For it is in moral as in natural things, the motion in minds as well as bodies is accelerated by a nearer approach to the centre to which they are tending."

— More, Hannah (1745-1833)

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Date: 1777

"A woman, who possesses this quality, has received a most dangerous present, perhaps not less so than beauty itself: especially it it be not sheathed in a temper peculiarly inoffensive, chastised by a most correct judgment, and restrained by more prudence than falls to the common lot."

— More, Hannah (1745-1833)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.