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Date: 1709

"What Passions in a Parent's Breast debate!"

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: w. c. 1704, 1709

"Provided still, you moderate your Joy, / Nor in your Pleasures all your Might employ: / Let Reason's Rule your strong Desires abate, / Nor please too lavishly your gentle Mate."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: w. c. 1709, 1711

"Yet if we look more closely, we shall find / Most have the seeds of judgment in their mind: / Nature affords at least a glimm'ring light; / The lines, tho' touch'd but faintly, are drawn right."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: w. c. 1709, 1711

"But as the slightest sketch, if justly trac'd, / Is by ill-colouring but the more disgrac'd, / So by false learning is good sense defac'd."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: w. c. 1709, 1711

"Tutors, like Virtuoso's, oft inclin'd / By strange transfusion to improve the mind, / Draw off the sense we have, to pour in new; / Which yet with all their skill, they ne'er could do."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: w. c. 1709, 1711

"Of all the causes which conspire to blind / Man's erring judgment, and misguide the mind,/ What the weak head with strongest biass rules, / Is Pride, the never-failing vice of fools."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: w. c. 1709, 1711

"For as in bodies, thus in souls we find / What wants in blood and spirits, swell'd with wind: / Pride, where Wit fails, steps in to our defence, / And fills up all the mighty void of sense"

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: w. c. 1709, 1711

"A little Learning is a dang'rous thing; / Drink deep, or taste not the Piërian spring: / There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain, / And drinking largely sobers us again."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: w. c. 1709, 1711

"While from the bounded level of our mind, / Short views we take, nor see the lengths behind, / But more advanc'd, behold with strange surprize / New distant scenes of endless science rise!"

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: w. c. 1709, 1711

"True wit is nature to advantage dress'd, / What oft' was thought, but ne'er so well express'd; / Something, whose truth convinc'd at sight we find, / That gives us back the image of our mind."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.