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Date: 1740

"Was there one joy, whose image does not last? / But that One; most extatic, most refin'd, / Reigns fresh, and will for ever in my mind, / With such a power of charms it storm'd my soul, / That nothing ever can it's strength controul."

— Prior, Matthew (1664-1721)

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Date: 1740

"The quiet of Our mind destroys, / Or with a full spring-tide of joys, / Or a dead-ebb of grief. "

— Prior, Matthew (1664-1721)

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Date: 1741

"But self-conceitedness does reign / In every mortal mind."

— Prior, Matthew (1664-1721)

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Date: 1743

"Still spread a healing mist before the mind; / And lest we err by Wit's wild dancing light, / Secure us kindly in our native night"

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: 1743

Dullness "rul'd, in native Anarchy, the mind"

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: 1743

"The language of poesy brings all into action; and to represent a Critic encompassed with books, but without a supper, is a picture which lively expresseth how much the true Critic prefers the diet of the mind to that of the body, one of which he always castigates, and often totally neglects for ...

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: 1743

"Still spread a healing mist before the mind; / And lest we err by Wit's wild dancing light, / Secure us kindly in our native night."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: 1743

"Enthusiasts of all ages were ever, in their natural state, most heavy and lumpish; but on the least application of heat, they run like lead, which of all metals falls quickest into fusion. "

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: 1743

"Thy mental eye, for thou hast much to view: / Old scenes of glory, times long cast behind / Shall, first recall'd, rush forward to thy mind: / Then stretch thy sight o'er all her rising reign, / And let the past and future fire thy brain."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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Date: 1743

"He began there to be uneasy; for it shock'd him to find he was commanded to believe against his own judgment in points of Religion, Philosophy, &c. for his genius leading him freely to dispute all propositions, and call all points to account, he was impatient under those fetters of the free-born...

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.