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Date: 1794

"But the latter was too deeply wounded, through the medium of her mind, to be quickly revived."

— Radcliffe [née Ward], Ann (1764-1823)

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Date: 1794

"In the eye of fancy, she perceived the gleam of arms through the duskiness of night, the glitter of spears and helmets, and the banners floating dimly on the twilight; while now and then the blast of a distant trumpet echoed along the defile, and the signal was answered by a momentary clash of a...

— Radcliffe [née Ward], Ann (1764-1823)

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Date: 1794

"Her first care was to guard the door of the stair-case, for which purpose she placed against it all the furniture she could move, and she was thus employed, for some time, at the end of which she had another instance how much more oppressive misfortune is to the idle, than to the busy; for, havi...

— Radcliffe [née Ward], Ann (1764-1823)

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Date: 1794

"A superstitious dread stole over her; she stood listening, for some moments, in trembling expectation, and then endeavoured to recollect her thoughts, and to reason herself into composure; but human reason cannot establish her laws on subjects, lost in the obscurity of imagination, any more than...

— Radcliffe [née Ward], Ann (1764-1823)

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Date: 1796

"The mind of a young woman lady should be clear and unsullied, like a sheet of white paper, or her own fairer face"

— Hays, Mary (1760-1843)

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Date: 1797

"But he had neither power or inclination to explain a circumstance, which must deeply wound the heart of Ellena, since it would have told that the same event, which excited her grief, had accidentally inspired his joy."

— Radcliffe [née Ward], Ann (1764-1823)

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Date: 1797

"In the eagerness of conversation, and, yielding to the satisfaction which the mind receives from exercising ideas that have long slept in dusky indolence, and to the pleasure of admitting new ones, the Abbot and a few of the brothers sat with Vivaldi to a late hour."

— Radcliffe [née Ward], Ann (1764-1823)

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Date: w. September 1794, 1797

"Wit, that no suffering could impair, / Was thine, and thine whose mental powers / Of force to chase the fiends that tear / From Fancy's hands her budding flowers."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1797

"Grief, the most fatal of the heart's diseases, / Soon teaches, who it fastens on, to die."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1799

"My heart was lightened of its wonted burthen, and I laboured to invent some harmless explication of the scene I had witnessed the preceding night."

— Brown, Charles Brockden (1771-1810)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.