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Date: 1788

"These various movements of her mind were not commented on, nor were the luxuriant shoots restrained by culture."

— Wollstonecraft, Mary (1759-1797)

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Date: 1788

"Thro' the mind of Delamere, a thousand confused ideas rapidly passed."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

"The idea which seemed to press most painfully on her mind, was the blemish which the purity of her character must sustain by her being so long absent with Delamere--a blemish which she knew could hardly ever be removed but by her returning as his wife."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

"But the moment the suddenness of his passion gave way to reflection, the tumult of his mind subsided, and he thought it must be an artifice of his mother's to separate him from Emmeline."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

"He told Lord Montreville that Delamere had conceived suspicions of Emmeline's conduct, tho' he knew not from what cause, that had at first excited the most uneasy jealousy, but which had at length subsided with his love; that he had regained his spirits; and, when he left his mother and sister, ...

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

"The vessel glided thro' the expanse of water; while the soul of Godolphin fled back to Emmeline, and dwelt with lingering fondness on the object of all it's affection."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

"While these reflections passed thro' his mind, he remained silent."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1788

"During the journey, Emmeline was low and dejected; from which she was sometimes roused by impatient enquiries and fearful apprehensions which darted into her mind, of what was to happen at the end of it."

— Smith, Charlotte (1749-1806)

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Date: 1790

"Absorbed in the single idea of being beloved, her imagination soared into the regions of romantic bliss, and bore her high above the possibility of evil."

— Radcliffe [née Ward], Ann (1764-1823)

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Date: 1790

"The scene she had witnessed, raised in the marchioness a tumult of dreadful emotions. Love, hatred, and jealousy, raged by turns in her heart, and defied all power of controul."

— Radcliffe [née Ward], Ann (1764-1823)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.