page 1 of 16     per page:
sorted by:

Date: 1817

"The wise Stagyrite speaks of no successive particles propagating motion like billiard balls, as Hobbes; nor of nervous or animal spirits, where inanimate and irrational solids are thawed down, and distilled, or filtrated by ascension, into living and intelligent fluids, that etch and re-etch eng...

— Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834)

preview | full record

Date: 1817

Recent dreamers and mind metaphorists imagine "chemical compositions by elective affinity, or of an electric light at once the immediate object and the ultimate organ of inward vision, which rises to the brain like an Aurora Borealis, and there, disporting in various shapes,--as the balance of pl...

— Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834)

preview | full record

Date: 1817

"The fashionable journal is expected to be a mirror of public opinion in its own party, a brilliant magnifying mirror, in which the mind of the public may see itself look large and handsome."

— Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834)

preview | full record

Date: 1817

Milton in his "latter days" was "poor, sick, blind, slandered, persecuted [...] yet still listening to the music of his thoughts."

— Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834)

preview | full record

Date: 1817

"The poetic PSYCHE, in its process to full development, undergoes as many changes as its Greek name-sake, the butterfly."

— Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834)

preview | full record

Date: 1817

"My friend has drawn a masterly sketch of the branches with their poetic fruitage. I wish to add the trunk, and even the roots as far as they lift themselves above the ground, and are visible to the naked eye of our common consciousness."

— Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834)

preview | full record

Date: 1817

"In our perceptions we seem to ourselves merely passive to an external power, whether as a mirror reflecting the landscape, or as a blank canvas on which some unknown hand paints it."

— Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834)

preview | full record

Date: 1817

Mackintosh, following Hobbes and Hartley, analogizes mind and matter: "the law of association being that to the mind, which gravitation is to matter. "

— Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834)

preview | full record

Date: 1817

"The wise Stagyrite speaks of no successive particles propagating motion like billiard balls (as Hobbs;) nor of nervous or animal spirits, where inanimate and irrational solids are thawed down, and distilled, or filtrated by ascension, into living and intelligent fluids, that etch and re-etch eng...

— Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834)

preview | full record

Date: 1817, 1818

"Yet in my hollow looks and withered mien / The likeness of a shape for which was braided / The brightest woof of genius, still was seen."

— Shelley, Percy Bysshe (1792-1822)

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.