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Date: 1688

"Here's Cavities, says one; and here, says he, / Is th' Seat of Fancy, Judgment, Memory: / Here, says another, is the fertile Womb, / From whence the Spirits Animal do come, / Which are mysteriously ingender'd here, / Of Spirits from Arterious Blood and Air: / Here, said a third, Life made her fi...

— Barker, Jane (1675-1743)

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Date: 1700

"For (says he) Man can no more be a Light to his Mind than he is to his Body: And thence infers, that as the Eye has no Light in it self, so neither the Understanding."

— Leslie, Charles (1650-1722)

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Date: 1700

" I will not take advantage of the Philosophy of this; for, I suppose his meaning to be, that it is Natural to the Understanding to Receive a Light that is infused into it, as for the Eye to see by an Extraneous light; that is, it is an Organ fitted to Receive Light, tho' it has none in it self; ...

— Leslie, Charles (1650-1722)

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Date: 1712, 1715, 1719

When a young Lady rallies or banters a young Gentleman it may be counted as "an Invitation to Courtship, or a transparent Mask, thro' which they see she has a Mind to be marry'd"

— Barker, Jane (1675-1743)

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Date: 1712, 1715, 1719

On emay be "absorp'd in Sorrow, and loaden with Afflictions," alleviated only by discreet Words which may calm my Passion and serve "as Balm to a Mind enflam'd with Sorrow"

— Barker, Jane (1675-1743)

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Date: 1715

"I will not repeat to you, Madam, the divers Conflicts of my Thoughts and the Agitation of my Mind on this Occasion; for my Interior labour'd as it were under a Fever and Ague, burning with an irresistible Inclination for Marcellus"

— Barker, Jane (1675-1743)

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Date: 1719

"You see, my Lord, said he with a Sigh, that I have put it out of her Power to triumph over my Weakness, for I confess my Heart still wears her Chains; but e'er my Eyes or Tongue betray to her the shameful Bondage, these Hands should tear them out."

— Haywood [née Fowler], Eliza (1693?-1756)

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Date: 1719

"The Count had never yet seen a Beauty formidable enough to give him an Hour's Uneasiness (purely for the Sake of Love) and would often say, Cupid's Quiver never held an Arrow of force to reach his Heart; those little Delicacies, those trembling aking Transports, which every Sight of the belov'd ...

— Haywood [née Fowler], Eliza (1693?-1756)

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Date: 1723

Fancy may stoop "to court the Aid of Sense, / Unable to conceive such Excellence!"

— Haywood [née Fowler], Eliza (1693?-1756)

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Date: 1723

"Covetousness we may truly call, The Dropsie of the Mind, it being an insatiable Thirst of Gain"

— Barker, Jane (1675-1743)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.