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Date: 1712, 1715, 1719

A contrivance may raze "out all those Characters of Friendship and fraternal Love, which [...] virtuous and generous Behaviour" may engrave in the Heart

— Barker, Jane (1675-1743)

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Date: 1722

"I got into an Arbor in the Garden, to peruse the dear Contents, which I very well remember, and are too deeply engraven in my Mind, ever to be forgotten."

— Haywood [née Fowler], Eliza (1693?-1756)

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Date: 1723

"AS Tapers languish at th' Approach of Day," and as the "Book of Fame" may be "Eraz'd and blotted," "So fully o'er the Soul may a lover's Influence reign, "That not one Rebel-Thought [its] Sway disdains"

— Haywood [née Fowler], Eliza (1693?-1756)

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Date: 1725

"[H]is Image was too deeply impress'd in her Mind, ever to banish it thence, tho' effac'd and blotted by the Memory of his Crimes"

— Haywood [née Fowler], Eliza (1693?-1756)

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Date: 1728

"Your Present's most gentile and kind, / Baith rich and shining as your Mind"

— Ramsay, Allan (1684-1758)

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Date: 1734

"The Memory is not only a Register of Tales, and Names, and Fictions, (the Materials of common Discourse) but may be called a Register of every thing that enters into the Senses and the Imagination."

— Forbes of Pitsligo, Alexander Forbes, Lord (1678-1762)

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Date: 1734

"The question is, how this Familiarity arises? and how the Cabinet comes to be sensible of any thing that's put into it? A Scritore knows nothing of the Papers which the careful Banker locks up in it? Or a Glass, tho' it may be said to receive the Image of a Beau, and he really sees somewhat of h...

— Forbes of Pitsligo, Alexander Forbes, Lord (1678-1762)

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Date: 1736

"That Ypre, which inspires the Lust of arbitrary Sway, now twisted its envenom'd Tail round the Heart of Eovaai; and, in an instant, erased all the Maxims the wise Eojaeu had endeavoured to establish there: so easy is it for the best Natures to be perverted, when Example rouses up the Sparks of s...

— Haywood [née Fowler], Eliza (1693?-1756)

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Date: 1736

"And as I am resolved, in spite of the Pleasure I take in gazing on them, to condemn myself to an eternal Absence, and to do every thing in my power to obliterate all Ideas from my Heart, that may render it an unworthy Offering to the Owner of this Jewel."

— Haywood [née Fowler], Eliza (1693?-1756)

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Date: 1744

"[T]he charming image of a city's brightest ornament" may be engraven on the heart by "the god of love ... in characters too indelible ever to be erased"

— Haywood [née Fowler], Eliza (1693?-1756)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.