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Date: 1700

"For (says he) Man can no more be a Light to his Mind than he is to his Body: And thence infers, that as the Eye has no Light in it self, so neither the Understanding."

— Leslie, Charles (1650-1722)

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Date: 1700

"He makes our Nature and Minds wholly Dark of themselves, only succeptible of Super-natural light, when sent into our Understanding."

— Leslie, Charles (1650-1722)

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Date: 1700

" I will not take advantage of the Philosophy of this; for, I suppose his meaning to be, that it is Natural to the Understanding to Receive a Light that is infused into it, as for the Eye to see by an Extraneous light; that is, it is an Organ fitted to Receive Light, tho' it has none in it self; ...

— Leslie, Charles (1650-1722)

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Date: 1700

"And so, tho they have Reason, yet are they not Reasonable, because that Reason is none of their own, only as Gifted, that is, Accidental, but not Natural to them; and so they can no more be called Rational, than a Bag can be called Rich, that has Money in it."

— Leslie, Charles (1650-1722)

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Date: 1709

"How soft the first ideas prove, / Which wander through our minds!"

— Finch [née], Anne, countess of Winchilsea (1666-1720)

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Date: 1712, 1715, 1719

A "Ladyship's Virtue and Prudence" may gain "absolute an Empire over the Hearts of the World."

— Barker, Jane (1675-1743)

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Date: 1712, 1715, 1719

When a young Lady rallies or banters a young Gentleman it may be counted as "an Invitation to Courtship, or a transparent Mask, thro' which they see she has a Mind to be marry'd"

— Barker, Jane (1675-1743)

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Date: 1712, 1715, 1719

"But why, oh! why have you given me an Interior, bearing so great a Resemblance to your own divine Purities, and not given me the Power to act accordingly; but have fix'd me in such a State, that my Actions must combat my Conscience, and my Conscience oppose my Reason, and all make a civil War in...

— Barker, Jane (1675-1743)

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Date: 1712, 1715, 1719

The "mysterious Turnings of human Cogitations" compose "Labyrinths for Reason to lose her Way, unless conducted by the Line of Vertue"

— Barker, Jane (1675-1743)

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Date: 1712, 1715, 1719

On emay be "absorp'd in Sorrow, and loaden with Afflictions," alleviated only by discreet Words which may calm my Passion and serve "as Balm to a Mind enflam'd with Sorrow"

— Barker, Jane (1675-1743)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.