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Date: 1760

"That the young sorcerer's fatal hand / Should round my soul his pleasing fetters tie."

— Akenside, Mark (1720-1771)

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Date: 1772

Reason may be bound in chains and vice may lord over it

— Akenside, Mark (1720-1771)

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Date: 1772

The "intellectual power" may bend "from his awful throne a wondering ear"

— Akenside, Mark (1720-1771)

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Date: 1772

The passions may be "gently "sooth'd away" and "Sink to divine repose"

— Akenside, Mark (1720-1771)

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Date: 1772

The Graces and Venus inhabit the mind. ( And the latter invites the soul "to never-fading joy"?)

— Akenside, Mark (1720-1771)

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Date: 1772

The mind is a machine roused by the "Passions fierce illapse," which "keeps the elastic powers / Intensely poiz'd"

— Akenside, Mark (1720-1771)

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Date: 1772

The soul may "feel her frame expanded" and exult like a young conqueror

— Akenside, Mark (1720-1771)

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Date: 1772

"This fable is one of the noblest in all the ancient mythology, and seems to have made a particular impression on the imagination of Milton."

— Akenside, Mark (1720-1771)

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Date: 1772

"With that strong master of our frame, / The inexorable judge within / What can be done?"

— Akenside, Mark (1720-1771)

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Date: 1772

"The poetry of them is often extremely noble; and the mysterious air which prevails in them, together with its delightful impression upon the mind, cannot be better expressed than in that remarkable description with which they inspired the German editor Eschenbach."

— Akenside, Mark (1720-1771)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.