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Date: 1649

"I see it a bad exchange to wound a mans owne Conscience, thereby to salve State sores; to calme the stormes of popular discontents, by stirring up a tempest in a mans owne bosome."

— Charles I (1600-1649); Gauden, John (1605-1662)

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Date: 1656

"We answer, Sight is twofold, corporeal and spirituall; the first is that of Sense, the other the Intellectuall faculty, by which we agree with Angels; this Platonists call Sight, the corporeall being only an Image of this"

— Stanley, Thomas (1625-1678)

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Date: 1656

"So Aristotle, Intellect is that to the Soul which sight is to the Body: Hence is Minerva (Wisdom) by Homer call'd, Bright-ey'd"

— Stanley, Thomas (1625-1678)

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Date: 1660, 1676

"Will and Conscience are like the cognati sensus, the Touch and the Taste; or the Teeth and the Ears, affected and assisted by some common objects, whose effect is united in matter and some real events, and distinguished by their formalities, or metaphysical beings."

— Taylor, Jeremy (bap. 1613, 1667)

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Date: 1660, 1676

"In the actions of human entercourse, and the notions tending to it, reason is our eye, and to it are notices proportion'd, drawn from nature and experience, even from all the principles with which our rational faculties usually do converse."

— Taylor, Jeremy (bap. 1613, 1667)

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Date: 1662

"Flowers, rivers, woods, the pleasant air and wind, / With Sacred thoughts, do feed my serious mind."

— Watkyns, Rowland (c. 1614-1664)

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Date: 1664

"The fancy, memory, and judgment are then extended (like so many limbs) upon the rack; all of them reaching with their utmost stress at nature; a thing so almost infinite and boundless, as can never fully be comprehended, but where the images of all things are always present."

— Dryden, John (1631-1700)

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Date: 1666

"Slow as a Drug, that in the body lies, / Our Phansy works; yours, like a Spirit, flyes"

— Killigrew, Sir William (bap. 1606, d. 1695)

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Date: 1673

" For tho the adulterations of art, can represent in the same Face beauty in one position, and deformity in another, yet nature is more sincere, and never meant a serene and clear forhead, should be the frontispiece to a cloudy tempestuous heart."

— Allestree, Richard (1611/2-1681)

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Date: 1678

"Into his studious Closet to stuff his Lunatick head, since he can get nothing for his belly."

— Porter, Thomas (1636-1680)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.