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Date: 1771

"The optics of some minds are in so unlucky a perspective, as to throw a certain shade on every picture that is presented to them; while those of others (of which number was Harley) like the mirrors of the ladies, have a wonderful effect in bettering their complexions"

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1771

"[T]he passions of men are temporary madhouses; and sometimes very fatal in their effects"

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1771

It "is curious to observe how the nature of truth may be changed by the garb it wears; softened to the admonition of friendship, or soured into the severity of reproof: yet this severity may be useful to some tempers; it somewhat resembles a file; disagreeable in its operation, but hard metals ma...

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1773

"But there was a judge in the bosom of Annesly, whom it was more difficult to satisfy; nor could he for a long time be brought to pardon himself that blow, for which the justice of his country had acquitted him."

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1773

One may blot from his mind "the idea of future retribution"

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1773

"The passions which thou didst implant in me, that reason which should balance them, is unable to withstand"

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1773

"Besides these, there were certain evenings appropriated to exercises of the mind."

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1777

The heart may be a subject of despotic love

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1777

The heart may be conquered without tumult

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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Date: 1777

"My father was far from being so once; but misfortune has now given his mind a tincture of sadness."

— Mackenzie, Henry (1745-1831)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.