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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"That the innate Principles of Morality, may, by Education, and Custom, and the general Opinion of those amongst whom we converse, be darkned, and at last quite worn out of the Minds of Men."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"It is easy to imagine, how by these means it comes to pass, that Men worship the Idols that have been set up in their Minds; grow fond of Notions they have been long acquainted with there."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

The ideas Man has of God are not "Marks of Himself, engraven in their minds by his own finger."

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"For to what purpose should Characters be graven on the Mind, by the Finger of God, which are not clearer there, than those, which are afterwards introduced, or cannot be distinguish'd from them?"

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

It is as impossible to see with another's eyes as to know with another's understanding

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Let us then suppose the Mind to be, as we say, white Paper, void of all Characters, without any Ideas; How comes it to be furnished?"

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"Whence comes that vast store, which the busy and boundless Fancy of Man has painted on it, with an almost endless variety?"

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"For, though he that contemplates the Operations of his Mind, cannot but have plain and clear Ideas of them; yet unless he turn his Thoughts that way, and considers them attentively, he will no more have clear and distinct Ideas of all the Operations of his Mind, and all that may be observed ther...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"I know it is an Opinion, that the Soul always thinks, and that it has the actual Perception of Ideas in it self constantly, as long as it exists; and that actual thinking is as inseparable from the Soul, as actual Extension is from the Body; which if true, to enquire after the beginning of a Man...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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Date: 1690, 1694, 1695, 1700, 1706

"To think often, and never retain it so much as one moment, is a very useless sort of thinking: and the Soul in such a state of thinking, does very little, if at all, excel that of a Looking-glass, which constantly receives variety of Images, or Ideas, but retains none; they disappear and vanish,...

— Locke, John (1632-1704)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.