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Date: 1662

The "active soul doth not consume with rust"

— Watkyns, Rowland (c. 1614-1664)

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Date: 1693

"Base vulgar drossie minds, with more alloy / Then is that captive wealth they might enjoy; / Which Thieves may steal, which Rust or Fire destroy;"

— Wesley, Samuel, The Elder (bap. 1662, d. 1735)

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Date: 1708

"Gold is the Magnet whose Attraction / Commands his Heart in ev'ry Action: / To that his Avaricious Soul / Points like the Needle to the Pole:"

— Ward, Edward (1667-1731)

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Date: 1708

"You know, Lavinia, once I lov'd you well; / Nor has your Crimes yet chang'd my Heart to Steel."

— Ward, Edward (1667-1731)

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Date: 1709, 1723, 1737, 1759

"Gold such Patience can inspire, / And so debase the Soul of Man,"

— Ward, Edward (1667-1731)

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Date: 1709, 1723, 1737, 1759

"Thy dying Words shall melt my stony Breast, / And pierce my weeping Soul whilst thou art blest"

— Ward, Edward (1667-1731)

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Date: 1709, 1723, 1737, 1759

"Never from my repenting Thoughts depart, / But stand, like Brass, imprinted in my Heart."

— Ward, Edward (1667-1731)

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Date: 1709, 1723, 1737, 1759

"I took thee for a Saint, but find, alas! / Thy Heart is Iron, and thy Face is Brass;"

— Ward, Edward (1667-1731)

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Date: 1710 [1719, 1729]

"[N]o alloy / Of Flesh" can destroy the "sprightly Beauties" of the soul "Nor Death nor Fate can snatch the lasting Joy. / Through ev'ry Limb the active Spirit flows;
Diffusing Life and Vigour as it goes, / But is it self unmixt, and free from Dross"

— Oldisworth, William (1680-1734)

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Date: 1710 [1719, 1729]

"Black Night comes on, and interrupts the Day, / E'er it can chase the Mists and Fogs away; / The Dregs of Flesh and Drossy Lees, o'errun / The Soul, and weigh the strugling Spirit down:"

— Oldisworth, William (1680-1734)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.