page 1 of 14     per page:
sorted by:

Date: November 9, 1662; 1663

"Aristotle indeed affirms the Mind to be at first a meer Rasa tabula; and that these Notions are not ingenite, and imprinted by the finger of Nature, but by the latter and more languid impressions of sense; being onely the Reports of observation, and the Result of so many repeated Experiments."

— South, Robert (1634-1716)

preview | full record

Date: 1670

"Having to his great Wit added the ballast of Learning"

— Walton, Izaak (1593-1683)

preview | full record

Date: 1692

"But now, Impartiality strips the Mind of Prejudice and Passion, keeps it right and even from the Byass of Interest and Desire, and so presents it like a Rasa Tabula, equally disposed to the Reception of all Truth."

— South, Robert (1634-1716)

preview | full record

Date: 1692

"For where Diligence opens the Door of the Understanding, and Impartiality keeps it, Truth is sure to find both an Entrance and a Welcome too."

— South, Robert (1634-1716)

preview | full record

Date: 1694

"An obliging Design, which wou'd procure them inward Beauty, to whom Nature has unkindly denied the outward; and not permit those Ladies who have comely Bodies, to tarnish their Glory with deformed Souls."

— Astell, Mary (1666–1731)

preview | full record

Date: 1694

"Your Glass will not do you half so much service as a serious reflection on your own Minds; which will discover Irregularities more worthy your Correction, and keep you from being either too much elated or depress'd by the representations of the other."

— Astell, Mary (1666–1731)

preview | full record

Date: 1694

"No solicitude in the adornation of your selves is discommended, provided you employ your care about that which is really your self; and do not neglect that particle of Divinity within you, which must survive, and may (if you please) be happy and perfect when it’s unsuitable and much inferiour Co...

— Astell, Mary (1666–1731)

preview | full record

Date: 1694

"What your own sentiments are, I know not, but I cannot without pity and resentment reflect, that those Glorious Temples on which your kind Creator has bestow'd such exquisite workmanship, shou'd enshrine no better than Egyptian Deities; be like a garnish'd Sepulchre, which for all it's glitterin...

— Astell, Mary (1666–1731)

preview | full record

Date: September 11, 1698

"For all the World acknowledges, that Hope and Fear are the two great Handles, by which the Will of Man is to be taken Hold of, when we would either draw it to Duty, or draw it off from Sin."

— South, Robert (1634-1716)

preview | full record

Date: 1698

"I was apt to think the best way were, to let Nature spend it self; and although those who write out of their own Thoughts do it with as much Ease and Pleasure as a Spider spins his Web; yet the World soon grows weary of Controversies, especially when they are about Personal Matters."

— Stillingfleet, Edward (1635-1699)

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.