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Date: 1722

"nor is my heart nae mair than yours of steel"

— Ramsay, Allan (1684-1758)

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Date: 1724

Shafts more subtile, may be darted from the Eye and "Thro' softer Hearts with silent Conquest fly"

— Ramsay, Allan (1684-1758)

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Date: 1724

A man may be ruled by "Honour and true Reason," "Which makes Submission to his Will / Nae Slav'ry, but a just Delight"

— Ramsay, Allan (1684-1758)

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Date: 1725

"What silly Notions crowd the clouded Mind, / That is thro' want of Education blind!"

— Ramsay, Allan (1684-1758)

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Date: 1728

"Their Hearts made of Stone, or of Steel are, / That are not Adorers of KATE."

— Ramsay, Allan (1684-1758)

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Date: 1728

"Your Present's most gentile and kind, / Baith rich and shining as your Mind"

— Ramsay, Allan (1684-1758)

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Date: 1728 (1733)

"Whereas Moralists and Philosophers, always taught, that a Man's Happiness did not depend upon any such vain Purfuits, or on the Possession or Enjoyment of any external Conveniencies or Accommodations; such as Riches, Beauty, sensual Pleasures, worldly Blandishments, or any of, the Goods of Fortu...

— Campbell, Archibald (1691–1756)

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Date: 1728 (1733)

"Shall he shut up all the Avenues of his Body, by which External Objects have access to affect his Mind ? And shall he rob the Mind her self of all Thought and Reflection?"

— Campbell, Archibald (1691–1756)

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Date: 1728 (1733)

"I say, our Author maintains that Moral Virtue is so far from allowing a Man to gratify his Appetites, that on the contrary it vigorously commands us to subdue them, and to divest ourselves of our Passions, in order to purify the Mind, as Men take out the Furniture when they would clean a Room th...

— Campbell, Archibald (1691–1756)

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Date: 1728 (1733)

"I believe I need not here remark, that the Mind only is that Part of, the human Constitution, which is the proper or the only Seat of Pleasure and Pain, no sort of Matter, however modified, being at all capable of any Sort of Perceptions."

— Campbell, Archibald (1691–1756)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.