page 1 of 12     per page:
sorted by:

Date: 1742

"But what hurt her most was, that in reality she had not so entirely conquered her Passion; the little God lay lurking in her Heart, tho' Anger and Disdain so hoodwinked her, that she could not see him"

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

preview | full record

Date: 1742

A lady may be "tortured with Perplexity; opposite Passions distracting and tearing her Mind different ways"

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

preview | full record

Date: 1742

"Lady Booby found good Reason to doubt whether she had so absolutely conquered her Passion, as she had flattered herself"

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

preview | full record

Date: 1742

One may be "a great Enemy to the Passions" and, like Parson Adams, preach "nothing more than the Conquest of them by Reason and Grace"

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

preview | full record

Date: 1742

"Yes, Joseph, my Eyes whether I would or no, must have declared a Passion I cannot conquer"

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

preview | full record

Date: 1742

"Yes, I thank Heaven and my Pride, I have now perfectly conquered this unworthy Passion"

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

preview | full record

Date: 1742

"Of this number I could name a Peer no less elevated by Nature than by Fortune, who whilst he wears the noblest Ensigns of Honour on his Person, bears the truest Stamp of Dignity on his Mind, adorned with Greatness, enriched with Knowledge, and embelished with Genius."

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

preview | full record

Date: 1742

"[H]e bewailed her Loss with Groans, which would have pierced any Heart but those which are possessed by some People, and are made of a certain Composition not unlike Flint in its Hardness and other Properties; for you may strike Fire from them which will dart through the Eyes, but they can never...

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

preview | full record

Date: 1742

"He had never contracted a Debt in his Life, and was consequently the less ready at an Expedient to extricate himself. Tow-wouse was willing to give him Credit 'till next time, to which Mrs. Tow-wouse would probably have consented (for such was Joseph's Beauty, that it had ma...

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

preview | full record

Date: 1742

"[A]nd when they perceive him so different from what he hath been described, all Gentleness, Softness, Kindness, Tenderness, Fondness, their dreadful Apprehensions vanish in a moment; and now (it being usual with the human Mind to skip from one Extreme to its Opposite, as easily, and almost as su...

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.