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Date: 1742

"[A]nd when they perceive him so different from what he hath been described, all Gentleness, Softness, Kindness, Tenderness, Fondness, their dreadful Apprehensions vanish in a moment; and now (it being usual with the human Mind to skip from one Extreme to its Opposite, as easily, and almost as su...

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: 1742

"But as it happens to Persons, who have in their Infancy been thoroughly frightned with certain no Persons called Ghosts, that they retain their Dread of those Beings, after they are convinced that there are no such things; so these young Ladies, tho' they no longer apprehend devouring, cannot so...

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: 1742

"The same Mistakes may likewise be observed in Scarron, the Arabian Nights, the 'History of Marianne' and 'Le Paisan Parvenu', and perhaps some few other Writers of this Class, whom I have not read, or do not at present recollect; for I would by no means be thought to comprehend those great ...

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: 1743

"This young Lady, amongst many other good Ingredients, had three very predominant Passions, to wit, Vanity, Wantonness, and Avarice."

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: 1743

"As his most powerful and predominant Passion was Ambition, so Nature had with consummate Propriety, adapted all his Faculties to the attaining those glorious Ends, to which this Passion directed him."

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: 1743

"Upon this, my Son Swane invaded the Coasts with several Ships, and committed many outragious Cruelties; which, indeed, did his business, as they served me to apply to the Fear of this King, which I had long since discovered to be his predominant Passion."

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: 1743

"He was very bad at acting any Part that was not quite sincere; but the present Confusion of her Mind was so great, she could not distinguish very clearly; and not knowing he was acquainted with what had passed between her and her Confidant, his Behaviour threw her into a great Consternation, and...

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: 1743

"Reason, however we flatter ourselves, hath not such despotic Empire in our Minds, that it can, with imperial Voice, hush all our Sorrow in a Moment"

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: 1743

Reason "doth not foolishly say to us, be not glad, orbe not sorry, which would be as vain and idle, as to bid the purling River cease to run, or the raging Wind to blow"

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: 1743

Sleep may torment one's imagination "with Fantoms too dreadful to be described"

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.