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Date: 1743

"Besides, as I never once thought, my Mind was useless to me, and I was an absolute Stranger to all the Pleasures arising from it"

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: 1743

"Mine is a true English Heart; it is an equal Stranger to the Heat of the Equator and the Frost of the Pole."

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: 1743

"Love still nourishes [the heart] with a temperate Heat, as the Sun doth our Climate; and Beauties rise after Beauties in the one, just as Fruits do in the other"

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: 1743

"The Pleasantness of this Vision, therefore, served only, on his awakening, to set forth his present Misery with additional Horrour, and to heighten the dreadful Ideas which now crowded on his Mind"

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: August, 1745

"Above the thirst of gold--if in his heart / Ambition govern'd, Av'rice had no part."

— Williams, Sir Charles Hanbury (1708-1759)

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Date: w. August, 1745; 1822

"Above the thirst of gold, if in his heart / Ambition govern'd, Av'rice had no part."

— Williams, Sir Charles Hanbury (1708-1759)

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Date: 1749

"[I]t would be an ill Office in us to pay a Visit to the inmost Recesses of his Mind, as some scandalous People search into the most secret Affairs of their Friends, and often pry into their Closets and Cupboards only to discover their Poverty and Meanness to the World."

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: 1749

"The Remembrance of past Pleasures affects us with a kind of tender Grief, like what we suffer for departed Friends; and the Ideas of both may be said to haunt our Imaginations"

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: 1749

A "Somewhat" may inhabit in the human breast that resembles the "famous Trunkmaker in the Playhouse"

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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Date: 1749

The internal "Somewhat" may be considered "as sitting on its Throne in the Mind, like the Lord High Chancellor of this Kingdom in his Court; where it presides, governs, directs, judges, acquits and condemns according to Merit and Justice; with a Knowledge which nothing escapes, a Penetration whic...

— Fielding, Henry (1707-1754)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.