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Date: 1380-1387

"Thus gan he make a mirour of his minde, / In which he saugh al hoolly hir figure."

— Chaucer, Geoffrey (c. 1340-1400)

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Date: 1384

"O Thought, that wroot al that I mette, / And in the tresorie hit shette / Of my brayn!"

— Chaucer, Geoffrey (c. 1340-1400)

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Date: 1386-1400

"That oon of hem was blynd and myghte not see, / But it were with thilke eyen of his mynde / With whiche men seen, after that they ben blynde."

— Chaucer, Geoffrey (c. 1340-1400)

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Date: 1605?

"Within thine eyes (the Mirrors of my minde) / Mine eies behold themselues, wherein they see / (As through a Glasse) what in my Soule I find; / And so my Soules right shape I see in thee."

— Davies, John (1564/5–1618)

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Date: 1651

"And as the Grindstone to unpolish'd Steel / Gives Edge, and Lustre: so my Mind, I feel / VVhetted, and glaz'd by Fortunes turning VVheel"

— Sherburne, Sir Edward (bap. 1616, d. 1702)

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Date: 1651

"'Tis but the Body that blind Fortunes spight / Can chain to Earth; the nobler Soul doth slight / Her servill Bonds, and takes to Heaven her flight."

— Sherburne, Sir Edward (bap. 1616, d. 1702)

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Date: 1651

"Why break'st thou not (my Soul) this Chain / Of Flesh? why lett'st thou that restrain / Thy nimble Flight into his Arms, / Whose only Look with gladness charms?"

— Sherburne, Sir Edward (bap. 1616, d. 1702)

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Date: 1651

"Now, treacherous Boy, thou hast me sure, / Playing the Wanton with my Heart, / As foolish Children that a Bird have got, / Slacken the Thread, but not unty the knot."

— Sherburne, Sir Edward (bap. 1616, d. 1702)

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Date: 1688

"When Friends advice with Lovers forces joyn, / They'll conquer Hearts more fortify'd than mine"

— Barker, Jane (1675-1743)

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Date: 1688

"Here's Cavities, says one; and here, says he, / Is th' Seat of Fancy, Judgment, Memory: / Here, says another, is the fertile Womb, / From whence the Spirits Animal do come, / Which are mysteriously ingender'd here, / Of Spirits from Arterious Blood and Air: / Here, said a third, Life made her fi...

— Barker, Jane (1675-1743)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.