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Date: 1611

"As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God."

— Author Unknown

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Date: 1611

"Our soul is escaped as a bird out of the snare of the fowlers: the snare is broken, and we are escaped."

— Author Unknown

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Date: 1611

"Pleasant words are as an honeycomb, sweet to the soul, and health to the bones."

— Author Unknown

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Date: 1611

"Will ye hunt the souls of my people, and will ye save the souls alive that come unto you?"

— Author Unknown

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Date: w. c. 64 [perhaps much later], 1611

"For ye were as sheep going astray; but are now returned unto the Shepherd and Bishop of your souls."

— Simon Peter or Saint Peter (d. c. 64)

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Date: 1651

"Now, treacherous Boy, thou hast me sure, / Playing the Wanton with my Heart, / As foolish Children that a Bird have got, / Slacken the Thread, but not unty the knot."

— Sherburne, Sir Edward (bap. 1616, d. 1702)

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Date: 1661

"But that, whose Sound, in the Pelîack Cave, / A Bridle to the Minds of Heroes gave, / And great Achilles Thoughts, the Centaure lov'd, / And when, upon the Strings, his Finger mov'd, / Hell's, or the Ocean's Fury 'twould allay."

— Ross, Thomas (bap. 1620, d. 1675)

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Date: 1683

"To Reason's yoke she quickly will incline, / Which, far from hurting, renders her divine; / But if neglected, will as easily stray, / And master Reason, which she should obey."

— Dryden, John (1631-1700) [Poem ascribed to]

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Date: 1693

"But why must those be thought to scape, that feel / Those Rods of Scorpions, and those Whips of Steel / Which Conscience shakes, when she with Rage controuls, / And spreads Amazing Terrors through their Souls?"

— Dryden, John (1631-1700) [Poem ascribed to]

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Date: 1693

"When once the hard-mouth'd Horse has got the Rein, / He's past thy Pow'r to stop; Young Phaeton, / By the Wild Coursers of his Fancy drawn, / From East to North, irregularly hurl'd, / First set on Fire himself, and then the World."

— Dryden, John (1631-1700) [Poem ascribed to]

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.