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Date: 1740

"How bruised and scarified! how deep the wound! / Senseless, of life no symptom to be found!"

— Dixon, Sarah (1671/2-1765)

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Date: 1740

"The Passion I have for you, and your Obstinacy, have constrained me to act by you in a manner that I know will occasion you great Trouble and Fatigue, both of Mind and Body"

— Richardson, Samuel (bap. 1689, d. 1761)

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Date: 1741 [1740]

One's mind may be "big with some important Meaning"

— Richardson, Samuel (bap. 1689, d. 1761)

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Date: 1740

"That he might, for his own dear sake, become a Partaker, a Partner in them; and then, thought I, when we can Hand in Hand, Heart in Heart, one Spirit, as well as one Flesh, join in the same Closet, in the same Prayers and Thanksgivings, what an happy Creature shall I be!"

— Richardson, Samuel (bap. 1689, d. 1761)

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Date: November, 1740

"The anatomist ought never to emulate the painter; nor in his accurate dissections and portraitures of the smaller parts of the human body, pretend to give his figures any graceful and engaging attitude or expression. There is even something hideous, or at least minute, in the views of thing...

— Hume, David (1711-1776)

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Date: 1741

"Says Body to Mind, ''Tis amazing to see, / We're so nearly related yet never agree, / But lead a most wrangling strange sort of life, / As great plagues to each other as husband and wife.'"

— Carter, Elizabeth (1717-1806)

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Date: 1741

"'Passion,' continued the doctor, still holding the dish, 'throws the mind into too violent a fermentation; it is a kind of fever of the soul or, as Horace expresses it, a short madness'

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744); Arbuthnot, John (bap. 1677, d. 1735)

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Date: 1741

"Crambe used to value himself upon this system, from whence he said one might see the propriety of the expression, 'such a one has a barren imagination;' and how common it is for such people to adopt conclusions that are not the issue of their premisses."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744); Arbuthnot, John (bap. 1677, d. 1735)

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Date: 1741

"But being weary of all practice on fetid bodies, from a certain niceness of constitution (especially when he attended Dr. Woodward through a twelve-months' course of vomition) he determined to leave it off entirely, and to apply himself only to diseases of the mind."

— Pope, Alexander (1688-1744); Arbuthnot, John (bap. 1677, d. 1735)

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Date: 1741

In "th' extended Scene of humane Race," Thoughts were "as various [as] was the Face"

— Ogle, George (1704-1746)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.