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Date: w. c. 1425-1440

"Then wolle the chambir of my thought trewly / Of plesaunce take a light in eche parté / Such ioy wolle him aray so fresshe and hy / That waken must myn heuy hert slepé / Out of his fowle and sluggissh slogardé."

— Charles [d'Orléans], duke of Orléans (1394–1465)

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Date: 1653

"As through a dark, and watry Cloud, more bright, / The Sun [thought] breakes forth with his Resplendent Light."

— Cavendish, Margaret (1623-1673)

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Date: 1653

"Sad melancholy Thoughts are for Shadowes plac'd, / By which the lighter Fancies are more grac'd."

— Cavendish, Margaret (1623-1673)

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Date: 1653

"Thoughts are for Shadowes plac'd, / By which the lighter Fancies are more graced. / As through a dark, and watry Cloud, more bright, / The Sun breakes forth with his Resplendent Light. / Or like to Night's black Mantle, where each Star / Doth clearer seem, so lighter Fancies are."

— Cavendish, Margaret (1623-1673)

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Date: 1653

"Some like to Rain-bowes various Colours shew, / So round the Braine Fantastick Fancies grow."

— Cavendish, Margaret (1623-1673)

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Date: 1658

"The Alc'ran sayes, (which who will may beleeve) / The Moon descended into Mahomet's sleeve: / 'Tis strange! yet God doth his loves lamp impart / T'a more coarcted room, what's that? the heart."

— Billingsley, Nicholas (bap. 1633, d. 1709)

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Date: 1658

"O may the lustre of those rayes divine / Be alwaies sparkling in this heart of mine!"

— Billingsley, Nicholas (bap. 1633, d. 1709)

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Date: 1660

"Things that the least of drossy mixture hold, / Last longest; my Hearts flames Ætherial be, / More pure than seven times refined Gold / Than Cedar's flames: rays of a Deitie / They are."

— Pordage, Samuel (bap. 1633, d. c. 1691)

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Date: 1667

"So much the rather thou Celestial light / Shine inward, and the mind through all her powers / Irradiate, there plant eyes, all mist from thence / Purge and disperse, that I may see and tell / Of things invisible to mortal sight."

— Milton, John (1608-1674)

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Date: 1667; 2nd ed. in 1674

"So much the rather thou, celestial Light, / Shine inward, and the mind through all her powers / Irradiate; there plant eyes, all mist from thence / Purge and disperse, that I may see and tell / Of things invisible to mortal sight."

— Milton, John (1608-1674)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.