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Date: 1600

"My heart to her but as guestwise sojourned / And now to Helen is it home returned, / There to remain."

— Shakespeare, William (1564-1616)

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Date: c. 1603

"When, however, you gave out the falsehood that truth is, as it were, the native inhabitant of the human mind and need not come in from, outside to take up its abode there; when you turned our minds away from observation, away from things, to which it is impossible we should ever be sufficiently ...

— Bacon, Sir Francis, Lord Verulam (1561-1626)

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Date: 1605

"But the poets and writers of histories are the best doctors of this knowledge; where we may find painted forth, with great life, how affections are kindled and incited; and how pacified and refrained; and how again contained from act and further degree; how they disclose themselves; how they wor...

— Bacon, Sir Francis, Lord Verulam (1561-1626)

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Date: 1607

"Therefore Iulian the Apostata who had flood of inuention, although that whole flood could not wash or rinch away that one spot of his atheisme, he (though not knowing him a right) could say the body was the chariot of the soule, which while it was well manag'd by discretion the cunning coachman,...

— Walkington, Thomas (b. c. 1575, d. 1621)

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Date: w. c. 90, trans. 1611

"And I will say to my soul, Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years; take thine ease, eat, drink, and be merry."

— Matthew the Evangelist

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Date: 1615

"Secondly, that the functions and offices of the outward senses, which are all placed as it were a guard in pension, in the palace of the head, and in the view and presence Chamber of Reason, which is their sovereign, might in a more excellent manner be exercised and put in practice."

— Crooke, Helkiah (1576-1648)

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Date: 1615

"Go too then, is not he said to know himself, who can tell how to temper and order the state and condition of his mind, how to appease those civil tumults within himself, by the storms and waves whereof he is pitifully tossed, and how to suppress and appease those varieties of passions wherewith ...

— Crooke, Helkiah (1576-1648)

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Date: 1615

"The parts that are included within the Chest, do serve the Heart; those that are in the head, do attend the Brain, and so each to others, do afford their mutual services. And if any one of them do at any time fail of their duty, presently the whole Household government goes to ruine and decay."

— Crooke, Helkiah (1576-1648)

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Date: 1615

"And this power or faculty when the braine hath once receiued it from the heart, standeth in no neede of continuall and immediate assistance therefrom, but onely of a supply after some time: Euen as the Commander of an Army, who hauing receiued his authority and his company from the Prince, stand...

— Crooke, Helkiah (1576-1648)

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Date: 1615

"They conclude therefore that the Brain and the Liver are truly called principal parts; but this principality is but delegatory from the heart, no otherways then the Lieutenants of Princes, by them chosen for such and such employments, doe receive from them an order and power of dispensation and ...

— Crooke, Helkiah (1576-1648)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.