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Date: 1753

One may work the rich ore of his imagination into "bright but useless medals."

— Montagu [née Robinson], Elizabeth (1718-1800)

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Date: January 28, 1753

"I have heard that his understanding was rather hurt by the absolute retirement in which he lived, and indeed he had an imagination too lively to be trusted to itself; the treasures of it were inexhaustible, but for want of commerce with mankind he made that rich oar into bright but useless medal...

— Montagu [née Robinson], Elizabeth (1718-1800)

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Date: 1754

"Mr. Locke, who has made a more exact dissection of the human mind than any man before him, declares he gained all his knowledge from consideration of himself."

— Montagu, Lady Mary Wortley [née Lady Mary Pierrepont] (1689-1762)

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Date: March 25, 1758

"Non, mon digne ami; ce n’est point sur quelques feuilles éparses qu’il faut aller chercher la loi de Dieu, mais dans le coeur de l’homme, où sa main daigna l’écrire. [It is not at all in a few sparse pages that we must seek for God's law, but in the human heart, where His hand deigned to write."

— Rousseau, Jean-Jacques (1712-1778)

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Date: w. 1757-1758, 1861

"Nous ne voyons ni l'âme d'autrui, parce qu'elle se cache, ni la notre, parce que nous n'avons point de miroir intellectuel [We do not see the soul of others, because it hides itself, nor our own, because we have no intellectual mirror]."

— Rousseau, Jean-Jacques (1712-1778)

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Date: 1760

"Oh, Sterne! thou art scabby, and such is the leprosy of thy mind that it is not to be cured like the leprosy of the body, by dipping nine times in the river Jordan."

— Whitefield, George (1714-1770)

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Date: 1762-1763

"Youth is the best season wherein to acquire knowledge, tis a season when we are freest from care, the mind is then unencumbered & more capable of receiving impressions than in an advanced age—in youth the mind is like a tender twig, which you may bend as you please, but in age like a sturdy oak ...

— Adams, Abigail (1744-1818)

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Date: September 3, 1766

"Donner le change à nos passions par le goût des belles connaissances, c'est enchaîner les amours avec des liens de fleurs."

— Rousseau, Jean-Jacques (1712-1778)

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Date: October 10, 1769

"My imagination without wing or broom stick off mounts aloft, rises into ye Regions of pure space, and without lett or impediment bears me to your fireside, where you can set me in your easy chair, and we talk and reason, as angel Host and guest Aetherial should do, of high and important matters."

— Montagu [née Robinson], Elizabeth (1718-1800)

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Date: 1773

"Though you are so happy as to have parents, who are both capable and desirous of giving you all proper instruction, yet I, who love you so tenderly, cannot help fondly wishing to contribute something, if possible, to your improvement and welfare: and, as I am so far separated from you, that it i...

— Mulso [later Chapone], Hester (1727-1801)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.