page 1 of 7     per page:
sorted by:

Date: 1561

A soul purged and "occupied in spirituall ... understanding" may "come to beholde the beautie that is seene with the eyes of the minde"

— Castiglione, Baldassare (1478-1529); Hoby, Sir Thomas (1530-1566), Trans.

preview | full record

Date: w. 1365, trans. 1579

"And euerie one hath continuall warre with him selfe in the most secret closet of his minde."

— Petrarch (1304-1374); Twyne, Thomas (1543–1613)

preview | full record

Date: w. 1365, trans. 1579

"For what tempests and madnesse is there in these foure passions, to wit, to hope or desire, and to reioice, to feare and to bee sorie, whiche trouble the poore and miserable minde, by driuing him with sodeine windes and gales, in course far from the hauen into the middes of the dangerous rocks?"

— Petrarch (1304-1374); Twyne, Thomas (1543–1613)

preview | full record

Date: 1675

"Since our minds are the Magazines of true wealth, and why should we expect that from Strangers, which we may bestow upon our Selves?"

— Le Grand, Antoine (1629-1699)

preview | full record

Date: 1675

"Nature is too liberal to deny us our Desires: She is too Noble to refuse us a gift which she preserves for us in the Cabinet of our Soul: and her Guide is too faithful to carry us astray from that good to which we aspire."

— Le Grand, Antoine (1629-1699)

preview | full record

Date: 1682

"I will have a care of being a Slave to my self; for it is a Perpetual, a Shameful, and the heaviest of all Servitudes; and this may be done by moderate Desires."

— L'Estrange, Sir Roger (1616–1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1682

"If it so happen, that a Man be ty'd up to Business, which he can neither loosen, nor break off; let him imagine those Shackles upon his Mind to be Irons upon his Legs: They are Troublesome at first, but when there's no Remedy but Patience, Custom makes them easie to us, and Necessity gives us Co...

— L'Estrange, Sir Roger (1616–1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1682

"They compare a Wicked Man's Mind to a Vitiated Stomach; he corrupts whatever he receives, and the best Nourishment turns to the Disease. But, taking this for granted, a Wicked Man may yet be so far Oblig'd, as to pass for Ungrateful, if he does not Requite what be Receives."

— L'Estrange, Sir Roger (1616–1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1682

"Every Man has a Judge, and a Witness within himself, of all the Good, and lll that he Does; which inspires us with great Thoughts, and administers to us wholsome Counsels."

— L'Estrange, Sir Roger (1616–1704)

preview | full record

Date: 1682

"Shall any Man see the Glory, and Order of the Universe; so many scatter'd Parts, and Qualities wrought into one Mass; such a Medly of Things, which are yet distinguished; the World enlighten'd, and the Disorders of it so wonderfully Regulated; and, shall he not consider the Author, and Disposer ...

— L'Estrange, Sir Roger (1616–1704)

preview | full record

The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.