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Date: 1691

"But again I won't forestall ye, tho' really the matter presses, and my pregnant Brain labours with so many painful pangs to be obstetricated, that I verily fear I shall burst before I come to disgorge it thro' my fruitful Quill, to avoid which I'll Ramble on as fast as I can scamper thro' this P...

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"As for the pretty little Virtues of Comity and Urbanity, this furnishes you to a miracle, for have you a mind to divert either your self or Friend with the most pleasant and agreeable entertainment, a Mans Jaws must be made of Iron, and fastn'd as close to one another, as if 'twere done with the...

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"I say I've but one little tiney favour to beg, and then--and that is--that he'd maturely Weigh, Swallow, Chew the Cud, and soundly digest this following first Book, before he throw it out agen, for should he make too much hast, and too greedily read it over, as 'tis to be fear'd the pleasantness...

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"I told you he Rambles with all his might, and 'tis true enough, for he sets his Heart upon't, and there's not one particle of his Body, nor immaterial Snip of his Soul, but Rambles as fast as his Legs, nay, some much faster."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"What shou'd I tell you of his Soul, since his Body is the very Picture on't, and if you know one, you can't miss o' t'other among a thousand: 'Tis like Gresham-Colledge, or the Anatomy-School at Leyden, hung round with a thousand Knick-knacks that rambled thither, some of 'em half the World...

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"Let it suffice, that my Soul for ought I know, has been Rambling the best part of this 6000 Years, if those are in the right on't who hold the Præexistence, and that all Souls were made at once.

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"All matter is in motion, and therefore perpetually chang'd and alter'd--now in how many shapes that little handful which makes up my Souls Luggage, has been formerly dress'd, I'll promise you, I'll not undertake to tell ye."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"This I say may be, and Graver folks than he have made a huge splutter with such a kind of business;--but I am apt to think (between Friends) if there be any thing in't, that most of the Lyoness Particles rambled somewhere else, to another Branch of the Family; and that more of the Sheep, the gen...

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"How the greatest part on't is an arrant cheat, and a mischievous one besides,--how little a while we generally stay in't, and yet how unfit to go out on't;--all these Reflections are now so strongly imprinted on my mind, that indeed I wonder how I could be perswaded to come abroad into Light."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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Date: 1691

"She was the paragon of Perfection, and Loadstar of all Eyes and Hearts; and well might my Dear Father Travel seven years after her Death, before he Marryed agen, for had he don't, not seven, nor seventeen, nor seventy, but seven hundred, he'd ne're have lit upon such another."

— Dunton, John (1659–1732)

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The Mind is a Metaphor is authored by Brad Pasanek, Assistant Professor of English, University of Virginia.